BayesFlux.jl

Bayesian addition to Flux.jl
Author enweg
Popularity
4 Stars
Updated Last
12 Months Ago
Started In
April 2022

CI

using BayesFlux, Flux
using Random, Distributions
using StatsPlots

Random.seed!(6150533)

BayesFlux (Bayesian extension for Flux)

BayesFlux is meant to be an extension to Flux.jl, a machine learning library written entirely in Julia. BayesFlux will and is not meant to be the fastest production ready library, but rather is meant to make research and experimentation easy.

BayesFlux is part of my Master Thesis in Economic and Financial Research - specialisation Econometrics and will therefore likelily still go through some revisions in the coming months.

Structure

Every Bayesian model can in general be broken down into the probablistic model, which gives the likelihood function and the prior on all parameters of the probabilistic model. BayesFlux somewhat follows this and splits every Bayesian Network into the following parts:

  1. Network: Every BNN must have some general network structure. This is defined using Flux and currently supports Dense, RNN, and LSTM layers. More on this later
  2. Network Constructor: Since BayesFlux works with vectors of parameters, we need to be able to go from a vector to the network and back. This works by using the NetworkConstructor.
  3. Likelihood: The likelihood function. In traditional estimation of NNs, this would correspond to the negative loss function. BayesFlux has a twist on this though and nomenclature might change because of this twist: The likelihood also contains all additional parameters and priors. For example, for a Gaussian likelihood, the likelihood object also defines the standard deviation and the prior for the standard deviation. This desing choice was made to keep the likelihood and everything belonging to it separate from the network; Again, due to the potential confusion, the nomenclature might change in later revisions.
  4. Prior on network parameters: A prior on all network parameters. Currently the RNN layers do not define priors on the initial state and thus the initial state is also not sampled. Priors can have hyper-priors.
  5. Initialiser: Unless some special initialisation values are given, BayesFlux will draw initial values as defined by the initialiser. An initialiser initialises all network and likelihood parameters to reasonable values.

All of the above are then used to create a BNN which can then be estimated using the MAP, can be sampled from using any of the MCMC methods implemented, or can be estimated using Variational Inference.

The examples and the sections below hopefully clarify everything. If any questions remain, please open an issue.

Linear Regression using BayesFlux

Although not meant for Simple Linear Regression, BayesFlux can be used for it, and we will do so in this section. This will hopefully demonstrate the basics. Later sections will show better examples.

Let's say we have the idea that the data can be modelled via a linear model of the form $$y_i = x_i'\beta + e_i$$ with $e_i \sim N(0, 1)$

k = 5
n = 500
x = randn(Float32, k, n);
β = randn(Float32, k);
y = x'*β + randn(Float32, n);

This is a standard linear model and we would likely be better off using STAN or Turing for this, but due to the availability of a Dense layer with linear activation function, we can also implent it in BayesFlux.

The first step is to define the network. As mentioned above, the network consists of a single Dense layer with a linear activation function (the default activation in Flux and hence not explicitly shown).

net = Chain(Dense(k, 1))  # k inputs and one output

Since BayesFlux works with vectors, we need to be able to transform a vector to the above network and back. We thus need a NetworkConstructor, which we obtain as a the return value of a destruct

nc = destruct(net)

We can check whether everything work by just creating a random vector of the right dimension and calling the NetworkConstructor using this vector.

θ = randn(Float32, nc.num_params_network)
nc(θ)

We indeed obtain a network of the right size and structure. Next, we will define a prior for all parameters of the network. Since weight decay is a popular regularisation method in standard ML estimation, we will be using a Gaussian prior, which is the Bayesian weight decay:

prior = GaussianPrior(nc, 0.5f0)  # the last value is the standard deviation

We also need a likelihood and a prior on all parameters the likelihood introduces to the model. We will go for a Gaussian likelihood, which introduces the standard deviation of the model. BayesFlux currently implements Gaussian and Student-t likelihoods for Feedforward and Seq-to-one cases but more can easily be implemented. See TODO HAR link for an example.

like = FeedforwardNormal(nc, Gamma(2.0, 0.5))  # Second argument is prior for standard deviation.

Lastly, when no explicit initial value is given, BayesFlux will draw it from an initialiser. Currently only one type of initialiser is implemented in BayesFlux, but this can easily be extended by the user itself.

init = InitialiseAllSame(Normal(0.0f0, 0.5f0), like, prior)  # First argument is dist we draw parameters from.

Given all the above, we can now define the BNN:

bnn = BNN(x, y, like, prior, init)

MAP estimate.

It is always a good idea to first find the MAP estimate. This can serve two purposes:

  1. It is faster than fully estimating the model using MCMC or VI and can thus serve as a quick check; If the MAP estimate results in bad point predictions, so will likely the full estimation results.
  2. It can serve as a starting value for the MCMC samplers.

To find a MAP estimate, we must first specify how we want to find it: We need to define an optimiser. BayesFlux currently only implements optimisers derived from Flux itself, but this can be extended by the user.

opt = FluxModeFinder(bnn, Flux.ADAM())  # We will use ADAM
θmap = find_mode(bnn, 10, 500, opt)  # batchsize 10 with 500 epochs

We can already use the MAP estimate to make some predictions and calculate the RMSE.

nethat = nc(θmap)
yhat = vec(nethat(x))
sqrt(mean(abs2, y .- yhat))

MCMC - SGLD

If the MAP estimate does not show any problems, it can be used as the starting point for SGLD or any of the other MCMC methods (see later section).

Simulations have shown that using a relatively large initial stepsize with a slow decaying stepsize schedule often results in the best mixing. Note: We would usually use samplers such as NUTS for linear regressions, which are much more efficient than SGLD

sampler = SGLD(Float32; stepsize_a = 10f-0, stepsize_b = 0.0f0, stepsize_γ = 0.55f0)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]

We can obtain summary statistics and trace and density plots of network parameters and likelihood parameters by transforming the BayesFlux chain into a MCMCChain.

using MCMCChains
chain = Chains(ch')
plot(chain)

In more complicated networks, it is usually a hopeless goal to obtain good mixing in parameter space and thus we rather focus on the output space of the network. Mixing in parameter space is hopeless due to the very complicated topology of the posterior; see ... We will use a little helper function to get the output values of the network:

function naive_prediction(bnn, draws::Array{T, 2}; x = bnn.x, y = bnn.y) where {T}
    yhats = Array{T, 2}(undef, length(y), size(draws, 2))
    Threads.@threads for i=1:size(draws, 2)
        net = bnn.like.nc(draws[:, i])
        yh = vec(net(x))
        yhats[:,i] = yh
    end
    return yhats
end

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

Similarly, we can obtain posterior predictive values and evaluate quantiles obtained using these to how many percent of the actual data fall below the quantiles. What we would like is that 5% of the data fall below the 5% quantile of the posterior predictive draws.

function get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, target_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95)
    qs = [quantile(yr, target_q) for yr in eachrow(posterior_yhat)]
    qs = reduce(hcat, qs)
    observed_q = mean(reshape(y, 1, :) .< qs; dims = 2)
    return observed_q
end

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

MCMC - SGNHTS

Just like SGLD, SGNHTS also does not apply a Metropolis-Hastings correction step. Contrary to SGLD though, SGNHTS implementes a Thermostat, whose task it is to keep the temperature in the dynamic system close to one, and thus the sampling more accurate. Although the thermostats goal is often not achieved, samples obtained using SGNHTS often outperform those obtained using SGLD.

sampler = SGNHTS(1f-2, 2f0; xi = 2f0^2, μ = 50f0)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

MCMC - GGMC

As pointed out above, neither SGLD nor SGNHTS apply a Metropolis-Hastings acceptance step and are thus difficult to monitor. Indeed, draws from SGLD or SGNHTS should perhaps rather be considered as giving and ensemble of models rather than draws from the posterior, since without any MH step, it is unclear whether the chain actually will converge to the posterior.

BayesFlux also implements three methods that do apply a MH step and are thus easier to monitor. These are GGMC, AdaptiveMH, and HMC. Both GGMC and HMC do allow for taking stochastic gradients. GGMC also allows to use delayed acceptance in which the MH step is only applied after a couple of steps, rather than after each step (see ... for details).

Because both GGMC and HMC use a MH step, they provide a measure of the mean acceptance rate, which can be used to tune the stepsize using Dual Averaging (see .../STAN for details). Similarly, both also make use of mass matrices, which can also be tuned.

BayesFlux implements both stepsize adapters and mass adapters but to this point does not implement a smart way of combining them (this will come in the future). In my experience, naively combining them often only helps in more complex models and thus we will only use a stepsize adapter here.

sadapter = DualAveragingStepSize(1f-9; target_accept = 0.55f0, adapt_steps = 10000)
sampler = GGMC(Float32; β = 0.1f0, l = 1f-9, sadapter = sadapter)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

The above uses a MH correction after each step. This can be costly in big-data environments or when the evaluation of the likelihood is costly. If either of the above applies, delayed acceptance can speed up the process.

sadapter = DualAveragingStepSize(1f-9; target_accept = 0.25f0, adapt_steps = 10000)
sampler = GGMC(Float32; β = 0.1f0, l = 1f-9, sadapter = sadapter, steps = 3)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

MCMC - HMC

Since HMC showed some mixing problems for some variables during the testing of this README, we decided to use a mass matrix adaptation. This turned out to work better even in this simple case.

sadapter = DualAveragingStepSize(1f-9; target_accept = 0.55f0, adapt_steps = 10000)
madapter = DiagCovMassAdapter(5000, 1000)
sampler = HMC(1f-9, 5; sadapter = sadapter)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

MCMC - Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings

As a derivative free alternative, BayesFlux also implements Adaptive MH as introduced in (...). This is currently quite a costly method for complex models since it needs to evaluate the MH ratio at each step. Plans exist to parallelise the calculation of the likelihood which should speed up Adaptive MH.

sampler = AdaptiveMH(diagm(ones(Float32, bnn.num_total_params)), 1000, 0.5f0, 1f-4)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

Variation Inference

In some cases MCMC method either do not work well or even the methods above take too long. For these cases BayesFlux currently implements Bayes-By-Backprop (...); One shortcoming of the current implementation is that the variational family is constrained to a diagonal multivariate gaussian and thus any correlations between network parameters are set to zero. This can cause problems in some situations and plans exist to allow for more felxible covariance specifications.

q, params, losses = bbb(bnn, 10, 2_000; mc_samples = 1, opt = Flux.ADAM(), n_samples_convergence = 10)
ch = rand(q, 20_000)
posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

More complicated FNN

What changes if I want to implement BNNs using more complicated Feedforward structures than above? Nothing! Well, almost nothing. The only thing that truly changes is the network you specify. All the rest could in theory stay the same. As the network becomes more complicated, it might be worth it to specify better priors or likelihoods though. Say, for example, we use the same data as above (in reality we would not know that it is coming from a linear model although it is always good practice to try simple models first), but instead of using the above network structure corresponding to a linear model, use the following:

net = Chain(Dense(k, k, relu), Dense(k, k, relu), Dense(k, 1))

We can then still use the same prior, likelihood, and initialiser. But we do need to change the NetworkConstructor.

nc = destruct(net)
like = FeedforwardNormal(nc, Gamma(2.0, 0.5))
prior = GaussianPrior(nc, 0.5f0)
init = InitialiseAllSame(Normal(0.0f0, 0.5f0), like, prior)
bnn = BNN(x, y, like, prior, init)

The rest is the same as above. We can, for example, first find the MAP:

opt = FluxModeFinder(bnn, Flux.ADAM())  # We will use ADAM
θmap = find_mode(bnn, 10, 500, opt)  # batchsize 10 with 500 epochs

nethat = nc(θmap)
yhat = vec(nethat(x))
sqrt(mean(abs2, y .- yhat))

Or we can use any of the MCMC or VI method - SGNHTS is just one option:

sampler = SGNHTS(1f-2, 1f0; xi = 1f0^2, μ = 10f0)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

yhats = naive_prediction(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

Recurrent Structures

Next to Dense layers, BayesFlux also implements RNN and LSTM layers. These two do require some additional care though, since the layout of the data must be adjusted. In general, the last dimension of x and y is always the dimension along which BayesFlux batches. Thus, if we are in a seq-to-one setting

  • seq-to-seq is not implemented itself but users can implement custom likelihoods to for a seq-to-seq setting - then the sequences must be along the last dimension (here the third). To demonstrate this, let us simulate sime AR1 data
Random.seed!(6150533)
gamma = 0.8
N = 500
burnin = 1000
y = zeros(N + burnin + 1)
for t=2:(N+burnin+1)
    y[t] = gamma*y[t-1] + randn()
end
y = Float32.(y[end-N+1:end])

Just like in the FNN case, we need a network structure and its constructor, a prior on the network parameters, a likelihood with a prior on the additional parameters introduced by the likelihood, and an initialiser

net = Chain(RNN(1, 1), Dense(1, 1))  # last layer is linear output layer
nc = destruct(net)
like = SeqToOneNormal(nc, Gamma(2.0, 0.5))
prior = GaussianPrior(nc, 0.5f0)
init = InitialiseAllSame(Normal(0.0f0, 0.5f0), like, prior)

We are given a single sequence (time series). To exploit batching and to not always have to feed through the whole sequence, we will split the single sequence into overlapping subsequences of length 5 and store these in a tensor. Note that we add 1 to the subsequence length, because the last observation of each subsequence will be our training observation to predict using the fist five items in the subsequence.

x = make_rnn_tensor(reshape(y, :, 1), 5 + 1)
y = vec(x[end, :, :])
x = x[1:end-1, :, :]

We are now ready to create the BNN and find the MAP estimate. The MAP will be used to check whether the overall network structure makes sense (does provide at least good point estimates).

bnn = BNN(x, y, like, prior, init)
opt = FluxModeFinder(bnn, Flux.RMSProp())
θmap = find_mode(bnn, 10, 1000, opt)

When checking the performance we need to make sure to feed the sequences through the network observation by observation:

nethat = nc(θmap)
yhat = vec([nethat(xx) for xx in eachslice(x; dims =1 )][end])
sqrt(mean(abs2, y .- yhat))

The rest works just like before with some minor adjustments to the helper functions.

sampler = SGNHTS(1f-2, 1f0; xi = 1f0^2, μ = 10f0)
ch = mcmc(bnn, 10, 50_000, sampler)
ch = ch[:, end-20_000+1:end]
chain = Chains(ch')

function naive_prediction_recurrent(bnn, draws::Array{T, 2}; x = bnn.x, y = bnn.y) where {T}
    yhats = Array{T, 2}(undef, length(y), size(draws, 2))
    Threads.@threads for i=1:size(draws, 2)
        net = bnn.like.nc(draws[:, i])
        yh = vec([net(xx) for xx in eachslice(x; dims = 1)][end])
        yhats[:,i] = yh
    end
    return yhats
end

yhats = naive_prediction_recurrent(bnn, ch)
chain_yhat = Chains(yhats')
maximum(summarystats(chain_yhat)[:, :rhat])

posterior_yhat = sample_posterior_predict(bnn, ch)
t_q = 0.05:0.05:0.95
o_q = get_observed_quantiles(y, posterior_yhat, t_q)
plot(t_q, o_q, label = "Posterior Predictive", legend=:topleft,
    xlab = "Target Quantile", ylab = "Observed Quantile")
plot!(x->x, t_q, label = "Target")

Customising BayesFlux

BayesFlux is coded in such a way that the user can easily extend many of the funcitonalities. The following are the easiest to extend and we will cover them below:

  • Initialisers
  • Layers
  • Priors
  • Likelihoods

Customising Initialisers

Every Initialiser must be implemented as a callable type extending the abstract type BNNInitialiser. As aready mentioned, it must be callable, with the only (optional) argument being a random number generator. It must return a tupe of vectors: (θnet, θhyper, θlike) where any of the latter two vectors is allowed to be of length zero. *For more information read the documentation of BNNInitialiser

Example: See the code for InitialiseAllSame

Customising Layers

BayesFlux relies on the layers currently implemented in Flux. Thus, the first step in implementing a new layer for BayesFlux is to implement a new layer for Flux. Once that is done, one must also implement a destruct method. For example, for the Dense layer this has the following form

function destruct(cell::Flux.Dense)
    @unpack weight, bias, σ = cell
    θ = vcat(vec(weight), vec(bias))
    function re::AbstractVector)
        s = 1
        pweight = length(weight)
        new_weight = reshape(θ[s:s+pweight-1], size(weight))
        s += pweight
        pbias = length(bias)
        new_bias = reshape(θ[s:s+pbias-1], size(bias))
        return Flux.Dense(new_weight, new_bias, σ)
    end
    return θ, re
end

The destruct method takes as input a cell with the type of the cell being the newly implemented layer. It must return a vector containing all network parameter that should be trained/inferred and a function that given a vector of the right length can restruct the layer. Note: Flux also implements a general destructure and restructure method. In my experience, this often caused problems in AD and thus until this is more stable, BayesFlux will stick with this manual setup.

Care must be taken when cells are recurrent. The actual layer is then not an RNNCell, but rather the full recurrent version: Flux.Recur{RNNCell}. Thus, the destruct methos for RNN cells takes the following form:

function destruct(cell::Flux.Recur{R}) where {R<:Flux.RNNCell}
    @unpack σ, Wi, Wh, b, state0 = cell.cell
    # θ = vcat(vec(Wi), vec(Wh), vec(b), vec(state0))
    θ = vcat(vec(Wi), vec(Wh), vec(b))
    function re::Vector{T}) where {T}
        s = 1
        pWi = length(Wi)
        new_Wi = reshape(θ[s:s+pWi-1], size(Wi))
        s += pWi
        pWh = length(Wh)
        new_Wh = reshape(θ[s:s+pWh-1], size(Wh))
        s += pWh
        pb = length(b)
        new_b = reshape(θ[s:s+pb-1], size(b))
        s += pb
        # pstate0 = length(state0)
        # new_state0 = reshape(θ[s:s+pstate0-1], size(state0))
        new_state0 = zeros(T, size(state0))
        return Flux.Recur(Flux.RNNCell(σ, new_Wi, new_Wh, new_b, new_state0))
    end
    return θ, re
end

As can be seen from the commented out lines, we are currently not inferring the initial state. While this would be great and could theoretically be done in a Bayesian setting, it also often seems to cause bad mixing and other difficulties in the inferential process.

Customising Priors

BayesFlux implements priors as subtypes of the abstract type NetworkPrior. Generally what happens when one calles loglikeprior is that BayesFlux splits the vector into θnet, θhyper, θlike and calls the prior with θnet and θhyper. The number of hyper-parameters is given in the prior type. As such, BayesFlux in theory allows for simple to highly complex multi-level priors. The hope is that this provides enough flexibility to encourage researchers to try out different priors. For more documentation, please see the docs for NetworkPrior and for an example of a mixture scale prior check out the code for MixtureScalePrior.

‼️ Note that the prior defined here is only for the network. All additional priors for parameters needed by the likelihood are handled in the likelihood. This might at first sound odd, but nicely splits network specific things from likelihood specific things and thus should make BayesFlux more flexible.

Customising Likelihoods

Likelihoods are implemented as types extending the abstract type BNNLikelihood and thus can be extended by implementing a new subtype. Traditionally likelihood truly only refer to the likelihood. We decided to go a somewhat unconventional way and decided to design BayesFlux in a way that likelihood types also include the prior for all parameters they introduce. This was done so that the network specification with priors and all is separate from the likelihood specification. As such, these two parts can be freely changed without changing any of the other?

Example: Say we would like to implement a simple Gaussian likelihood for a Feedforward structure (this is already implemented). Unless we predifine the standard deviation of the Gaussian, we will also estimate it, and thus we need a prior for it. While in the traditional setting this would be covered in the prior type, here it is covered in the likelihood type. Thus, the version as implemented in BayesFlux takes upon construction also a prior distribution that shall be used for the standard deviation. This prior does not have to have as its domain the real line. It can also be constrained, such as a Gamma distribution, as long as the code of the likelihood type makes sure to appropriately transform the distribution to the real line. In the already implemented version this is done using Bijectors.jl.

The documentation for BNNLikelihood gives details about what exactly need to be implemented.


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